“After the Uprising,”: Who Could Have Killed Danyé Jones?

The mysterious death of Danyé Jones left his family reeling, in shock and disbelief at the notion he could take his own life. While we’ve previously examined the plausibility of the idea that he would die by suicide, we must also address the question: If Danyé didn’t kill himself, then who could have killed him? Who had the opportunity, the means, and the motive to do so?

The mysterious death of Danyé Jones left his family reeling, in shock and disbelief at the notion he could take his own life. While we’ve previously examined the plausibility of the idea that he would die by suicide, we must also address the question: If Danyé didn’t kill himself, then who could have killed him? Who had the opportunity, the means, and the motive to do so?

With such little to go on, we must engage in speculation and chasing down leads, no matter how hopeless they seem. For example, Melissa’s sister Latoya recalled a strange white man who appeared at Danyé’s funeral. He spoke to no one, paid no respects to the body and appeared to read a bible in order to look busy. Then he left.

The brother of Danyé’s stepfather Derek recalls Danyé being worried about a group of white boys that were out to get him. According to his mother, about a month before his death Danyé claimed to have encountered a group of white men who proceeded to call him the N-word, after which Danyé knocked one of them out. This led Danyé to ask Derek’s brother about the possibility of getting himself a gun for protection.

There’s also the mysterious cars that Melissa says she saw randomly on her street for months prior to her son’s death, black SUVs and similar vehicles with tinted windows. At one point she and her family witnessed five or six white men leave the cars and stand in front of their house. Danyé and his mother were alarmed, because to them, the men looked and carried themselves like cops. However, efforts to determine whether their house was placed under surveillance proved unfruitful, and it doesn’t appear that the police investigated Melissa’s reported sightings, even after she told detectives the morning of Danyé’s death.

Obviously, the sickening legacy of lynching and the well-documented systemic racism of the St. Louis area would lead one to believe that Danyé’s hanging was a racially-motivated murder, but that’s not neccesarily the case. There are other potential actors out there who could have wanted him dead for reasons not involving racial hatred or police retribution.

What if Danyé was lured away from his house on the night of his death by a mysterious third party with murderous intentions? That’s one theory offered by Danyé’s family, who speak of a step-nephew they call “Deenie Boy” who was seemingly up to no good.

Parties who knew him well stated that Deenie had spoken to Danyé about a desire to kill someone close to him using bad drugs to make it look like an overdose. Horrified, Melissa and Danyé demanded that Deenie leave their house. Some time later, the person Deenie spoke about did indeed die, though there’s little evidence linking Deenie to her death.

Before Danyé left for Idaho, he had gotten involved in Deenie Boy’s escapades in the drug trade, making drug “runs” for Deenie and his father. This is part of the reason Danyé left Missouri, to escape this lifestyle and find a new path for himself. Once Danyé returned home, driving a Lexus and posting online about his new real estate business, Deenie Boy began making threats. His family wonders if these threats may be the reason that Danyé began sleeping with a brick next to his bed. The brick could also have been protection against the mysterious white people who were seemingly stalking his home. However, there were additional unsavory parties who could have had it out for him as well.

In a previous episode, we spoke of Marcell, the man who allegedly shot Danyé’s best friend Damon and narrowly missed hitting his brother, Javon. Examining Danyé’s texts, some give the appearance that Danyé was planning some sort of revenge against Marcell, though not directly. According to Danyé’s text to his mother, “the streets” would take care of that. Danyé also sent texts to his out of town friend Mi’Sheanna, warning her that he might need a place to crash for a week, and to former girlfriend Dasha, to whom he sent photos that the context suggests were of Marcell and asked if her people could “line it up.”

Could Marcell have realized that Danyé was potentially planning harm toward him? Is that the reason Danyé slept with a brick at his bedside? At first, Dasha believed that Danyé simply wanted her to get him in the same room as Marcell, but upon seeing the texts and other evidence, she changed her tune, saying it sounds like something Danyé would pull together but not tell her about, and, shockingly, that she believed that he had it in him to kill someone in order to protect his family. This disclosure was surprising, but ultimately just one woman’s opinion. Danyé’s family vehemently disagree that he’d be capable of such an act.

In terms of more concrete revelations, Dasha offered two new items of interest: She had loaned Danyé an iPad, leaving open the possibility that somewhere out there is an Apple device with Danyé’s accounts logged in, making her next revelation even more important: A previously unseen Facebook post from Danyé on October 16th. On that fateful day, he posted a meme that read “Tired...” followed by the hand-waving emoji.

The “tired” post could be read as a goodbye, but both Dasha and Melissa can at least agree that Danyé was not the kind of person who would take his own life. “Tired” could mean anything. It could mean “tired” of the racial injustice faced every day in America and “tired” of the police not facing repercussions for their actions. It could mean “tired” of the people allegedly staking out their house or threatening violence on Danyé and his family. It could simply mean physically tired, as anyone starting out in the real estate world can attest.

Right now, we only know what we don’t know. It will take assistance from someone in power, someone with the ability to issue subpoenas and crack open the data in Danyé’s accounts. On the next installment of ‘After the Uprising,’ we’ll meet such a person, one who supposedly promised to give all the residents of St. Louis county a fair shake.

For more about potential suspects in the death of Danyé Jones, as well as more revelations from ex-girlfriend Dasha, listen to the 10th episode of the ‘After the Uprising’ podcast, and follow ‘After the Uprising’ on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for further updates and insights on Danyé’s story.