Anti-Abortion Lawmakers Gear Up To Target The Abortion Pill Next

Abortion pills now account for more than half of U.S abortions, according to the New York Times. With access to abortion on the Supreme Court chopping block, many advocates fear that these safe alternatives might be the next to go.

Bottles of the drug misoprostol sit on a table at the West Alabama Women's Center on Tuesday, March 15, 2022 in Tuscaloosa, Ala. The drug is one of two used together in "medication abortions." According to Planned Parenthood, misoprostol, taken after mifepristone, causes cramping and bleeding to empty the uterus. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
Bottles of the drug misoprostol sit on a table at the West Alabama Women's Center on Tuesday, March 15, 2022 in Tuscaloosa, Ala. The drug is one of two used together in "medication abortions." According to Planned Parenthood, misoprostol, taken after mifepristone, causes cramping and bleeding to empty the uterus. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

Monday night’s news of Roe V. Wade's possible overturn left a dark cloud over the future of reproductive rights. Many Americans must now plan for what’s to come if the overturn officially goes through, including figuring out safe ways to access abortions.

In light of the news, many are turning to the FDA approved pill alternatives to in-clinic abortion that can be taken at home and terminate an early pregnancy with symptoms similar to a heavy period.

As people seek safe options in the face of anti-abortion measures; experts say anti-abortion advocates and lawmakers are gearing up to prevent people from accessing pill alternatives.

Abortion pills account for more than half of U.S abortions, according to the New York Times. Back in 2000, there was a huge spike in usage following the FDA’s approval of the medication mifepristone. Last year, the FDA lifted a standard that required women pick up abortion pills in person, and now allows for nationwide delivery through the mail.

As republican majority states like South Dakota, Texas, Kentucky, Arkansas, Ohio, Tennessee and Oklahoma continue to impose abortion bans, many people have begun the process of traveling cross-state to fill prescriptions in states that do not have heavy abortion restrictions, or utilizing international online pharmacies.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Sue Leibel, State Policy Director for Susan B. Anthony List, a notable anti-abortion organization, said cross-border trips, remote doctor consultations, and pill deliveries are what they will try to stop next.

Already we’re beginning to see ways in which lawmakers are trying to curb abortions performed without the direct role of a provider. As of today, 19 states require a physican be physically present when abortion pills are being administered.

On Wednesday the Louisiana House advanced a bill that would allow pregnant people, and anyone who helps in terminating a pregnancy, be charged directly with homicide. This means pregnant people who are administering their own pills could be charged on counts of murder.

According to Al-Jazeera, advocates are continuing to use tech as a solution to access. Interim Dean and Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law, Rachel Rebouche, says virtual health providers will definitely be instrumental in the ongoing fight.