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Australian Officials Will Kill Camels Threatening Water Sources

At least 10,000 wild camels have reportedly migrated to Aboriginal lands in the region amidst hot weather and a severe drought that led to recent wildfires.

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Australian officials plan to shoot large groups of camels that have migrated to towns, damaging certain regions and contaminating water sources needed for the bushfires. 

The blazes have so far killed at least two dozen people — including volunteer firefighters — and an estimated 1 billion animals. More animals are expected to be killed — this time by local authorities who plan to shoot wild camels and some feral horses that are straining water sources in South Australia. 

At least 10,000 wild camels have reportedly migrated to Aboriginal lands in the region amidst hot weather and a severe drought that led to recent wildfires. Officials say camels damage property and drink from water sources needed by residents of the area. 

Officials from Australia's department for environment and water will shoot the camels from helicopters. 

“We have been stuck in stinking hot and uncomfortable conditions, feeling unwell, because the camels are coming in and knocking down fences, getting in around the houses and trying to get to water through air conditioners,’’ Marita Baker, an executive board member in the Aboriginal community told The Australian. 

Camels are also known to create a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions and emit methane of approximately one ton per year.

Rainfall in Australia earlier this week brought some much-needed relief to the region that’s been consumed by four months of intense fires. But uncontained blazes continue to rock the area, according to local officials, and their effects are now spreading across the world. 

On Monday, the NOAA released images that show a cloud of smoke bigger than the United States has blown from eastern Australia all the way to South America.

To learn more on how you can help contribute to the recovery, visit our donation guide here. 
 

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