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Black Lives Matter Mural That Trump Called “Symbol Of Hate” Is Now Outside Trump Tower

Activists, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Rev. Al Sharpton, and volunteers joined together to paint the mural.

Volunteers and members of the media walk along a Black Lives Matter mural that was painted on Fifth Avenue in front of Trump Tower, Thursday, July 9 in New York. | AP Images
Volunteers and members of the media walk along a Black Lives Matter mural that was painted on Fifth Avenue in front of Trump Tower, Thursday, July 9 in New York. | AP Images

Bold yellow letters that now stretch across the pavement outside Trump Tower in New York City echo a nationwide rallying cry: “Black Lives Matter.”

The mural on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue was completed on Thursday after a mix of volunteers, activists, and Department of Transportation employees, along with Rev. Al Sharpton and Mayor Bill de Blasio, helped paint it. 

The mural is one of five that the city has planned to add in neighborhoods including Bedford-Stuyvesant, as protesters have demanded the defunding of NYPD.

On Thursday in New York City, people pushed paint rollers while chanting “Whose streets? Our streets!” On the same day, the Supreme Court ruled Manhattan’s district attorney can pursue President Trump’s financial records.
 

In June, the first yellow-lettered Black Lives Matter mural was painted in Washington, D.C., in the wake of protests against systemic racism and police brutality after the death of George Floyd. It sits in the Black Lives Matter plaza, which D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser recently named.

Last week, President Trump criticized the decision to paint the Black Lives Matter mural in front of a skyscraper emblazoned with his own name on Fifth Avenue, saying it would “[denigrate] the luxury Avenue.” In a series of tweets last week, Trump called the proposed mural a “symbol of hate,” and claimed De Blasio, a Democrat who once competed to run against him in the 2020 presidential race, “hates & disrespects” police officers. 

Meanwhile, the president has repeatedly defended the preservation of Confederate monuments that protesters and cities in recent weeks have torn down.

De Blasio shared the plans for the mural on Fifth Avenue last week on MSNBC after outlining a new city budget proposal, which includes a $1 billion cut from the NYPD. The mayor said the city will reallocate the money toward youth initiatives and recreation centers to “help young people particularly in this tough moment in history.”
 
Trump has also publicly condemned the largely peaceful demonstrations that swept the country and are still ongoing in cities including New York. De Blasio has made his own enemies and drawn criticism for defending police officers’ use of force at the protests.