California Creates First-of-Its-Kind Ebony Alert To Find Missing Black Children and Young Women

Though Black people make up only 13% of the U.S. population, 39% of missing person cases last year involved people of color, the Black and Missing Foundation reports.

Associated Press
Associated Press

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) has signed into law S.B. 673, which will create the nation’s first Ebony Alert system to inform the public about missing Black children and young women between the ages of 12 and 25.

More than 600,000 people are reported missing each year in the U.S. on average, according to the National Crime Information Center. Though Black people make up only 13% of the U.S. population, 39% of missing person cases last year involved people of color, the Black and Missing Foundation reports.

‘It is important to continue to raise awareness about this issue and advocate for policies that prioritize finding missing people of color,’ Black and Missing Foundation co-founder Natalie Wilson told NPR.

Despite such a large portion of the missing people in the U.S. being Black youths and women, cases involving people of color rarely make national news or receive the resources they need. Activists say the alert system will combat this inequality.

‘We must ensure that every missing person is given the same amount of attention and resources, regardless of their race or socioeconomic status,’ Wilson added.

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By KENADEE MANGUS