Congress Finally Addressed UFOs in a Monumental Pentagon Briefing

The topic at today’s hearing was out of this world (literally)

So today there wasn’t your average hearing in Washington D.C.: Pentagon officials testified on the subject of unidentified flying objects. This was the first time in over half a century that a House panel was held on what is more commonly known as UFOs.

There is very little talk on UFOs or extraterrestrials on a public scale, but we see the subject everywhere in the media. Hollywood loves a good government-hiding-information-about-aliens plot, and we enjoy watching it, from “Men in Black” to the new season of “American Horror Story.” It’s a topic that is ubiquitous with the idea of secrecy and hiding something big from the public.

The interest in unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) has been growing over the years, specifically whether or not they pose a threat, and what the government's role is in all of this.


In 2020, the Pentagon authorized the release of three videos showing unidentified aerial phenomena after the clips were previously released by a private company. The official statement read, “The U.S. Navy previously acknowledged that these videos circulating in the public domain were indeed Navy videos. After a thorough review, the department has determined that the authorized release of these unclassified videos does not reveal any sensitive capabilities or systems, and does not impinge on any subsequent investigations of military air space incursions by unidentified aerial phenomena.”


Then, in 2021, a document released by the U.S. intelligence community was issued to Congress that listed 144 UAP encounters between 2004 and 2021 reported by military aviators.


Fast forward about a year, and today’s historic hearing had us learn more in person on the matter.Pentagon officials began by announcing that the number of unidentified aerial phenomena is now over 400, which is quite a stark increase.


We then heard from Rep. André Carson (D-IN), who oversaw the hearing. He expanded on why having this official dialog took so long and touched on the stigma that exists around reporting UAP sightings, stating that, "for too long, the stigma associated with UAPs has gotten in the way of good intelligence analysis. Pilots avoided reporting or were laughed at when they did. DOD officials relegated the issue to the back room, or swept it under the rug entirely, fearful of a skeptical national security community. Today, we know better.”

The hearing also included visuals, including a previously classified video of a UAP cruising past a military jet, to which Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Scott Bray testified: "I do not have an explanation for what this specific object is." Showing these videos and having this hearing is part of a larger effort to bring transparency to the general public on a topic that has long been shrouded in secrecy.


A report last year, released by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Pentagon's UAP Task Force concluded that there was no evidence that the objects in any of the videos were extraterrestrial, but also could not explain the origin of it.


Officials noted that while this meeting was publicly broadcast, there will be another classified hearing.