LGBTQ+

Costa Rica Becomes First Central American Country To Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

Costa Rica is the sixth Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, joining Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Uruguay.

Getty Images/Alexandra Quiros and Dunia Araya's wedding ceremony in Heredia, Costa Rica

Two women were married on national television in Costa Rica this week, marking the country’s first legal same-sex marriage. 

Costa Rica legalized same-sex marriage early Tuesday when a ruling from its Supreme Court ending the country’s ban went into effect. The ban’s lifting came nearly two years after the Supreme Court initially ruled that it was unconstitutional.

Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado Quesada tweeted on Monday that the new ruling will give same-sex couples and their families “the same rights as any other couple or family in this country.”

“Together, under the same flag, let's build a better nation,” he continued. 

Enrique Sanchez, Costa Rica's first openly gay congressman, also told Reuters on Tuesday that the country’s legalization of same-sex marriage is culmination of a years-long battle by activists.

“With their experience, their struggles ... they have helped build a society where there are no second-class families or second-rate people,” he explained. 

Same-sex couples around the country held ceremonies in celebration of the ruling – many of which were private due to the coronavirus outbreak. Among them were Dunia Araya and Alexandra Quirós, who got married on Tuesday just after midnight, making them the first same-sex couple in Costa Rica to legally wed, according to local reports.

The couple live streamed the outdoor ceremony, which was performed by a notary wearing a face mask. It was also broadcast on national television, according to the BBC.

Costa Rica is first Central American country and the sixth Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, joining Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Uruguay. Parts of Mexico also allow same-sex couples to marry.