Could This Change the Future of Online Testing? Scientists Hack Anti-Cheating Software

Students using Proctorio have to install either an app or web extension that monitors their eye movement and body language. These trackers are designed to flag “suspicious” behavior.

A group of scientists and students have teamed up to crack the code on anti-cheating software.

Proctorio is an anti-cheating software that is used by schools globally. Researchers from University of Twente in the Netherlands found it is easy for students to outsmart such softwares.

Students using Proctorio have to install either an app or web extension that monitors their eye movement and body language. These trackers are designed to flag “suspicious” behavior.

During the study, 30 student volunteers were hired. Six of them were instructed to cheat on an exam, while fiveof them were told not to cheat, but to act suspicious. The remaining 19 were told to take the test as normal.

The results showed that the software was not able to spot any of the people actually cheating. However, it did spot honest students who were not cheating and taking the test in a noisy environment. Researchers said the results can be “best compared to taking a placebo: it has some positive influence, not because it works but because people believe that it works, or that it might work.”