How To Support Atlanta’s Asian-American Community Now

Stop AAPI hate in all its shapes and forms.

Julie Tran holds her phone during a candlelight vigil in Garden Grove, California, on March 17, 2021 to unite against the recent spate of violence targeting Asians and to express grief and outrage after yesterday's shooting that left eight people dead in Atlanta, Georgia, including at least six Asian women. | Getty Images
Julie Tran holds her phone during a candlelight vigil in Garden Grove, California, on March 17, 2021 to unite against the recent spate of violence targeting Asians and to express grief and outrage after yesterday's shooting that left eight people dead in Atlanta, Georgia, including at least six Asian women. | Getty Images

This past Tuesday afternoon, mass shootings occurred at two separate massage parlors in Atlanta, leaving eight dead, many of them of Asian descent. Following these heinous hate crimes in our own backyard, it is more crucial than ever to stand up against Asian hate and be a true ally for Atlanta’s Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. Nonprofit social organization Stop AAPI Hate disclosed that it has received roughly 3,800 reports of anti-Asian hate incidents around the country since the start of the pandemic, and it’s important to recognize how these hate-fueled crimes have been stoked by the xenophonic rhetoric surrounding COVID-19.

Condemning Asian hate and helping to uplift and support the local AAPI community following the unspeakable tragedies in Midtown and Cherokee County is of the utmost importance. Here are five ways that you can support Georgia’s AAPI community right now.


Advocate for the civil and human rights of Asian Americans in Georgia

Advancing Justice Atlanta is a nonprofit legal advocacy organization dedicated to protecting the civil rights of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPI) in Georgia and the Southeast. If you’re interested in becoming an advocate for Atlanta’s Asian-American community, volunteering with Advancing Justice is a great first step. As a volunteer, you can help with civic engagements and organizing, election protection, and immigration legal services.


Fund a grassroots organization dedicated to AAPI interests and policies

As we all witnessed in the 2020 presidential election, marginalized communities of color, including Atlanta’s AAPI community, made a historical impact on the election results. The representation of Asian-American and Pacific Islander interests in legal and political circles is crucial, and you can help push for more AAPI involvement in local and state politics by donating to the Asian American Advocacy Fund and/or signing up to volunteer with the organization.

Patronize local AAPI-owned restaurants

Another way to support and show long-term solidarity with Atlanta’s Asian-American and Pacific Islander community is by spending money at AAPI-owned restaurants. Next time you head out to grab a bite to eat, remember that restaurants such as Lazy Betty, Sweet Auburn Barbecue, and Hawkers Asian Street Fare all boast AAPI ownership.


Donate to Atlanta’s Asian American Resource Center

The financial hardships of the pandemic have pushed countless Atlantans into homelessness, and coupled with the rise of Asian hate over the past year, Atlanta’s homeless AAPI population is even more at risk. The Asian American Resource Center Rapid Re-Housing Program is dedicated to helping homeless families find and maintain housing. Support the AARC’s efforts by donating to the organization.


Report Asian hate crimes and incidents

If you witness any form of Asian hate, do not stand by or turn a blind eye to the situation. Regardless of the magnitude of the incident, it is crucial to make a note of it so that it can possibly be prevented in the future. By visiting Stop AAPI Hate’s website, you can report an Asian hate incident in 11 languages, which helps the nonprofit gather data that informs where it needs to push for better protection, educational resources, and policies. Still, if you or someone is in immediate danger, report the hate crime to local authorities first.

This article was originally published on Thrillist.