Rocket Debris Falling to Earth Sparks Anxiety

Trackers are attempting to predict when and where the booster will crash. As of Friday afternoon, the booster will re-enter Earth’s atmosphere on tomorrow at 2:05 pm ET, give or take 5 hours, according to the Aerospace Corporation.

This past weekend, China sent a massive rocket booster into space, and many are worried about where it will land during its uncontrolled re-entry.

After a Long March 5B rocket reached space, the core booster detached and began to orbit Earth, slowly falling back toward us. The booster is currently one of the largest objects to re-enter Earth, measuring more than 100 feet long and weighing 25 tons.

Trackers are attempting to predict when and where the booster will crash. As of Friday afternoon, the booster will re-enter Earth’s atmosphere on tomorrow at 2:05 pm ET, give or take 5 hours, according to the Aerospace Corporation.

It’s too early to tell where the booster will land. According to the Centre for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies, “over 88% of the world's population lives under the re-entry potential debris footprint.” It’s also estimated that between 20 and40% of the mass of a large object will reach the ground.

Although many are concerned about the crash location, the Chinese government assures there is nothing to worry about. The Global Times said China has a “flawless safety record” and that the U.S is “is running out of ways” to stop the development of China’s progress in the aerospace sector.