SCOTUS Issues Decisions Weakening Miranda Rights and Concealed Carry Gun Laws

In a 6-3 decision for Vega v. Tekoh, the Court ruled that individuals cannot sue for a civil rights violation if an officer(s) failed to warn them of their Miranda rights

The U.S. Supreme Court building continues to be surrounded by a temporary security fence on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court is due to hand down opinions in several important cases, including Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which could overturn the 50-year-old federal right to abortion. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
The U.S. Supreme Court building continues to be surrounded by a temporary security fence on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court is due to hand down opinions in several important cases, including Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which could overturn the 50-year-old federal right to abortion. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court’s conservative majority issued two decisions on Thursday that weakened both gun reform legislative efforts and the rights of criminal legal defendants, respectively.

In a 6-3 decision for Vega v. Tekoh, the Court ruled that individuals cannot sue for a civil rights violation if an officer(s) failed to warn them of their Miranda rights — even if the subsequent evidence obtained by police following the lack of a Miranda warning is used in a criminal trial.

In her dissent, liberal Justice Elena Kagan blasted the decision, saying it “prevents individuals from obtaining any redress when police violate their rights under Miranda.”

And in a 6-3 decision for New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, the conservative jurists upended a New York gun law that strictly limited concealed carry permits in the state. The law, which has been on New York’s books for more than a century, requires citizens to demonstrate “proper cause” before being allowed a concealed carry permit.

Today’s Supreme Court decision comes as Congress pushes some of the most impactful gun violence prevention legislation in almost 30 years, per NBC.