Texas Abortion Providers Ask SCOTUS To Mandate Appeals Court To Resurface Case Against S.B. 8

“Texas didn't eliminate abortions. They just outsourced them,” says Zack Gingrich-Gaylord, communications director at Trust Women Clinic.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments against S.B. 8 on November 1, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Credit: Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments against S.B. 8 on November 1, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Credit: Getty Images

Lawyers representing the Center for Reproductive Rights in its case against Texas’ restrictive abortion law, S.B. 8, submitted legal filings Monday night asking the U.S. Supreme Court to mandate that the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals resurface their case on the grounds that its postponement has been gratuitous.

The ban in Texas against abortions after six weeks — a time at which many women are not yet aware that they are pregnant — has remained in effect for the past four months, while both medical providers and residents await the crucial ruling.

For some women, this could mean being forced to carry unwanted pregnancies to full term, or potentially running the risk of seeking unsafe alternatives to terminate their pregnancies.

Clinics in Oklahoma, Texas’ neighboring state where its Supreme Court blocked three anti-abortion laws, are witnessing a spike in the number of women seeking abortions as a result of S.B. 8.

“Texas didn't eliminate abortions. They just outsourced them,” Zack Gingrich-Gaylord, the communications director of the Trust Women clinic told News on 6, a Tulsa-based outlet.