News

Trump Fires Top Election Security Official Who Debunked False Claims About Voting Fraud

Chris Krebs, now former director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, repeatedly stated that there has been no evidence of election fraud despite President Trump’s unfounded claims.

Chris Krebs, former director of The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, testifies during a Senate hearing on October 19, 2017 in Washington, D.C. | Getty Images
Chris Krebs, former director of The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, testifies during a Senate hearing on October 19, 2017 in Washington, D.C. | Getty Images

President Donald Trump has fired Chris Krebs, a top cybersecurity official who publicly stated that there was no evidence of voter fraud, despite the president’s false assertions that the election was rigged. 

On Tuesday night, Trump tweeted that Krebs “has been terminated as Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.” The platform then labeled the president’s tweets about Krebs’ firing as disputed.

Last week, CISA, an agency under the umbrella of Homeland Security, issued a joint statement with members of the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council calling the 2020 election “the most secure in American history.” 

“There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised,” the statement read. “While we know there are many unfounded claims and opportunities for misinformation about the process of our elections, we can assure you we have the utmost confidence in the security and integrity of our elections, and you should too.”

The statement came after Trump and Republican allies repeatedly and baselessly claimed that the election was fraudulent and that Trump won the presidency. Experts and state election officials have disputed these claims, confirming that former Vice President Joe Biden won the 2020 election. 

Trump’s campaign team has filed lawsuits in several states since Election Day, demanding recounts or stopping the ballot counts altogether. Judges have thrown out almost all of the lawsuits, and Trump and his allies are 1-25 in court, according to voting rights lawyer Marc Elias. 

Krebs has been vocal through his now-archived agency Twitter account, videos, and press releases about the danger of disinformation about voter fraud. Krebs also doubled down on CISA’s statement this week:

“On allegations that election systems were manipulated, 59 election security experts all agree, ‘in every case of which we are aware, these claims either have been unsubstantiated or are technically incoherent,’” Krebs wrote. 

In Tuesday night’s Twitter firing, the president stayed firm in his unfounded theories about the election and wrote in the disputed tweets, “the 2020 Election was highly inaccurate, in that there were massive improprieties and fraud - including dead people voting, Poll Watchers not allowed into polling locations, ‘glitches’ in the voting machines which changed… votes from Trump to Biden, late voting, and many more.”

On Krebs’ personal Twitter, he changed his bio to, “Used to be the 1st Director @CISAgov.” He also tweeted: “Honored to serve. We did it right.”

CISA was established in 2018 by the Trump administration after the president signed into law the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act of 2018. Krebs served as the agency’s first director.