U.S. To End Trump-Era “Remain In Mexico” Policy

Arguments about whether Biden had the authority to end the policy played out for months in the judicial system, with the administration ultimately reimplementing MPP in December following a court order.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced Monday that it will be officially ending the “Remain in Mexico” policy, which has impacted the lives of thousands of migrants.

First implemented by the Trump administration in 2019, the policy required many people seeking asylum at the U.S. border to wait in Mexico for immigration court hearings—a process that often took months, if not years. According to CBS News, at least 70,000 people were sent to Mexico under the policy—also known as the Migrant Protection Protocols, or MPP— during the Trump administration. Between the time the policy started and January 2021, when newly inaugurated President Joe Biden initially suspended it, there were more than 1,500 cases of “murder, rape, torture, kidnapping, and other violent assaults” against migrants subjected to MPP, per advocacy organization Human Rights First.

However, arguments about whether Biden had the authority to end the policy played out for months in the judicial system, with the administration ultimately reimplementing MPP in December following a court order. Finally, in June, the Supreme Court ruled that the administration could terminate the policy. SCOTUS certified its ruling last week, and on Monday, U.S. District Judge Matthew Kacsmaryk of Texas lifted his injunction ordering the administration to reinstate MPP.

Monday’s announcement means that asylum seekers will no longer be enrolled in the program going forward, and those currently waiting in Mexico won’t be sent back once they return to the U.S. for their next court date, according to a DHS statement.

In the statement, DHS said it is working to end the policy in a “quick, and orderly, manner.”