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Man Who Filmed Ahmaud Arbery’s Killing Has Been Arrested

William Bryan, 50, has been charged with felony murder and criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment.

Ahmaud Arbery, 25, was shot and killed while jogging in Georgia in February. William Bryan, pictured during a CNN interview with Chris Cuomo on May 11, recorded the video of the murder. | runwithmaud.com / CNN
Ahmaud Arbery, 25, was shot and killed while jogging in Georgia in February. William Bryan, pictured during a CNN interview with Chris Cuomo on May 11, recorded the video of the murder. | runwithmaud.com / CNN

The man who recorded the video of Ahmaud Arbery being shot and killed while jogging in Georgia was arrested on Thursday. He is the third suspect to be arrested in connection with Arbery’s killing.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) announced that it charged William Bryan, 50, with felony murder and criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment. Bryan will be held in county jail, the bureau said.

On February 23, Arbery, a 25-year-old unarmed Black man, was jogging when former police officer Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael, 34, allegedly chased him down, shot, and killed him. The GBI said that "both Gregory and Travis McMichael confronted Arbery with two firearms," and that during the encounter, "Travis McMichael shot and killed Arbery."

More than two months later, the McMichaels were each charged with murder and aggravated assault and taken into custody.

RELATED: Ahmaud Arbery: What To Know About Shooting Death Of The Georgia Jogger

The graphic video footage of the incident went viral earlier this month after activist Shaun King shared it on social media. The footage, taken in a vehicle being driven behind Arbery, shows him being shot multiple times. 

The video release sparked national outrage, with advocacy groups, public figures, and politicians calling for an investigation into the attack.

A trial in the case likely wouldn't be launched until after June 12 at the earliest, as Georgia's jury trials are suspended until then due to the coronavirus pandemic.