Trump's America

Paul Manafort Released From Prison For Home Confinement Over COVID-19 Concerns

No positive cases have been confirmed at the prison complex where Manafort was serving time.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort exits the courtroom after his arraignment in New York Supreme Court in New York, U.S., June 27, 2019. | Reuters
Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort exits the courtroom after his arraignment in New York Supreme Court in New York, U.S., June 27, 2019. | Reuters

Paul Manafort was released from prison early Wednesday to serve more than four remaining years of his sentence from home because of coronavirus concerns, his attorney confirmed to multiple outlets. 

The 71-year-old former Trump campaign chairman has been serving a 7-year sentence in a low-security prison in Pennsylvania for bank fraud, tax fraud, and conspiracy. He has been in prison since 2018 and will return to his home in Alexandria, Virginia. ABC News first reported the news.

Manafort’s lawyers sought his release because of the risks of the deadly virus as recently as April and cited his pre-existing conditions including high blood pressure and liver disease. He was hospitalized late last year because of heart problems.

The Bureau of Prisons has placed nearly 2,500 prisoners in home confinement during the coronavirus outbreak. Attorney General Bill Barr sent a memo in March advising the BOP to prioritize home confinement for inmates who are most at risk. At least 2,800 people detained in federal prisons and 260 staff members have tested positive for COVID-19 as of Wednesday, according to BOP data.

No positive cases have been confirmed at the Loretto complex where Manafort was serving time.

Manafort was convicted in 2018 on felony charges of bank and tax fraud. He pleaded guilty to additional charges in a separate federal case in Washington, D.C., and was sentenced to serve more time in 2019.

The longtime GOP operative worked for the Trump campaign starting in spring of 2016 and served as campaign chair from June to August. He resigned after media outlets reported on his lobbying work for pro-Russian Ukrainian oligarchs — work for which he received millions of dollars. He was indicted by Robert Mueller’s team in 2017 during the Russia investigation.