House Votes To Demote Marjorie Taylor Greene

In a bipartisan, 230-199 vote, the House has stripped Rep. Greene (R-GA) from her roles on the Budget Committee and the Education and Labor Committee. 11 Republicans joined with Democrats in the move— more than voted to impeach Pres. Trump.

U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers voted on whether to remove Greene, who backs the QAnon conspiracy theory group, from two House committees, after leaders failed to agree on the first-term congresswoman's fate. | Getty Images
U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers voted on whether to remove Greene, who backs the QAnon conspiracy theory group, from two House committees, after leaders failed to agree on the first-term congresswoman's fate. | Getty Images

The House of Representatives voted Thursday to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-CA) from her assignments on the House Budget and Education and Labor Committees. In the bipartisan, 230-199 vote to demote Greene, 11 Republicans joined with Democrats — more than voted to impeach former President Donald Trump. 

The proceedings came after House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) declined to reprimand Greene for her past actions, which have included endorsing violence against Democratic lawmakers, making anti-Semitic comments, and perpetuating baseless conspiracy theories about QAnon, election fraud, and school shootings. 

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) submitted a resolution to strip the first-term lawmaker of those duties earlier this week. 

During remarks Thursday, Greene wore a facial covering that said “Free Speech” and appeared to walk back some of her past claims, including by affirming that the 9/11 attacks happened.

House GOP leaders decided not to take action against Greene for her past comments during a closed-door meeting on Wednesday night, according to NBC News. The House also said Greene “has denounced her previous comments and expressed regret over those actions,” though she has yet to publicly apologize. Multiple outlets reported that GOP members gave Greene a “standing ovation” after she delivered remarks during Wednesday’s meeting. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said in a press conference on Thursday that she was “profoundly concerned about House Republican leadership’s acceptance of extreme conspiracy theorists.” 

Greene has attracted attention since being elected to Congress in 2020 for her history of supporting baseless conspiracy theories, including that the 2018 California wildfires were started by a laser beam from space operated by Jewish bankers, and that the Parkland and Sandy Hook mass school shootings were staged. Recently surfaced video shows her harassing Parkland survivor and gun reform activist David Hogg just weeks after the mass shooting, calling him a “coward” and claiming he was being funded by billionaire George Soros. She also has questioned if planes actually crashed into the Pentagon on 9/11 and has promoted QAnon. 

CNN reported last week that Greene “liked” comments in 2018 and 2019 on Facebook calling for the execution of Democratic leaders including Pelosi, former President Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton.

Pelosi ripped into Greene last week by calling her assignment to the House Education and Labor Committee “appalling.”

“What I'm concerned about is the Republican leadership in the House of Representatives who are willing to overlook — ignore those statements — assigning her to the Education Committee when she has mocked the killing of little children at Sandy Hook Elementary School, when she mocked the killing of teenagers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas. What could they be thinking?” Pelosi said during last week’s press conference.

A handful of Republican members of Congress have condemned Greene’s past statements, including Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY), who, in a statement to the Hill on Monday, called them “loony lies and conspiracy theories” and a “cancer for the Republican Party.” McConnell did not mention Greene by name, but cited conspiracy theories she has supported.

“Somebody who’s suggested that perhaps no airplane hit the Pentagon on 9/11, that horrifying school shootings were pre-staged, and that the Clintons crashed JFK Jr.’s airplane, is not living in reality,” McConnell said in a statement to the Hill. “This has nothing to do with the challenges facing American families or the robust debates on substance that can strengthen our party.”

Rep. McCarthy also condemned Greene’s past comments in a statement on Wednesday, but called the Democrats’ push to remove Greene from her assignments a “partisan power grab” and added that it “distracts Congress.”

In 2019, the GOP stripped then-Rep. Steve King (R-IA) of assignments after he inquired how language like “white supremacy” became “offensive” during an interview with the New York Times.

Separately, the House GOP voted on a secret ballot Wednesday night to allow Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in January, to keep her third-ranking position in the party. Trump loyalists in the GOP had been calling for Cheney, who voted with the ex-president nearly 93% of the time, to be stripped of her leadership position. Last week, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) traveled to Wyoming to call for constituents to vote her out of office in 2022.