Global Ice Melt Now Following UN's Worst-Case Climate Scenarios

The planet lost more than 30 trillion tons of ice between 1994 and 2017 — global ice melt has now reached its 'worst-case scenario.'

According to research published in The Cryosphere in January 2021, Earth lost more than 30 trillion tons of ice between 1994 and 2017. Every region the scientists observed had lost ice, but the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets were melting the fastest.

Glacier and sea ice melt contribute to rising sea levels, thereby increasing the flood risk in coastal communities. Ice melt also contributes to climate change by reducing the ocean’s ability to reflect the sun’s rays.